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Fun Fact Sheet: Flounder

Typically found in estuaries and coastal waters off Western Australia, flounder have an interesting life history.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 21.09.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: Cleaning Station

There are many symbiotic relationships between organisms in the marine environment, which can have either beneficial or detrimental effects.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 24.07.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: Australian Herring

Owing to similarities in shape, adult herring can easily be confused with juvenile Australian salmon.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 06.05.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: Hammerhead Shark

Hammerhead sharks are easily identifiable by their distinctive hammer-like heads.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 05.05.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: Chiton

There are around 1,000 different species of chitons worldwide. In Australia, South Australia has the greatest concentration of species.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 04.05.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: Barnacles

There are 1,200 species of barnacles around the world that come in a variety of shapes and sizes.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 04.05.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: Lionfish

I am brightly coloured and have a pattern of zebra-like stripes over my body. These stripes are usually white and either red, maroon or brown.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 04.05.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: Dhufish

Dhufish are endemic to Western Australia, meaning they are found no where else in the world.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 30.04.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: Coral Trout

I am a predator species that lives on coral reefs.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 30.04.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: Humpback Whale

Humpback whales are found in all the world’s major oceans. 

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 30.04.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: Manta Rays

Manta rays are the largest species of rays in the world.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 29.04.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: West Australian Seahorse

Swaying in the current, anchored by their grasping tails, seahorses are actually a type of small fish - with bony plates protecting their bodies instead of scales.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 29.04.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: Cuttlefish

With eight arms, three hearts and blue blood, cuttlefish could easily be mistaken for something from outer space.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 29.04.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: Bumphead Parrotfish – Indian Ocean Territories

Bumphead Parrotfish are one of the largest fish to be found on the coral reefs of the Indian Ocean Territories.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 01.04.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: Yellowlip Emperor – Indian Ocean Territories

The common name 'sweetlip' is used in the Indian Ocean Territories to describe a couple of emperor species - the orange-striped emperor and the yellowlip emperor.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 01.04.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: Mullet (Cocos Keeling Islands)

Two species of mullet are found in the lagoon at Cocos (Keeling) Islands; diamond scale mullet and sea mullet.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 01.04.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: Giant Trevally

Of the large trevally family, the most well-known is the Giant Trevally.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 01.04.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: Loggerhead Turtle

The loggerhead turtle is one of six marine turtles found in Australia, including the green, leatherback, olive ridley, hawksbill and flatback turtles.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 01.04.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: Humphead maori wrasse

Humphead maori wrasse (Cheilinus undulatus) are a large and long-lived species of wrasse that can be found on Indo-Pacific coral reefs in water ranging from 1 to 100 metres depth.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 01.04.2020

Fun Fact Sheet: White Shark

White sharks are warm blooded. They have a heat-exchanging circulatory system that allows them to maintain their body temperature above that of the surrounding seawater. This allows them to swim at high speeds through cooler water.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 20.08.2019

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