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Student Worksheet: Monkeys of the Sea

This worksheet is associated with the Lesson: Monkeys of the sea

Resource type: Student WorksheetLast updated: 20.08.2019

Fun Fact Sheet: Hammerhead Shark

Hammerhead sharks are easily identifiable by their distinctive hammer-like heads.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 20.08.2019

Fun Fact Sheet: White Shark

White sharks are warm blooded. They have a heat-exchanging circulatory system that allows them to maintain their body temperature above that of the surrounding seawater. This allows them to swim at high speeds through cooler water.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 20.08.2019

Fun Fact Sheet: Great Barracuda

Barracuda are pelagic fish, meaning they are found near the surface of the water, and are one of the fastest fish in the sea!

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 20.08.2019

Fun Fact Sheet: Golden Ghost Crab

Have you ever seen holes on the beach that look as though they have been made by someone poking an umbrella in the sand? You may actually have been looking at the burrow of a golden ghost crab.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 20.08.2019

Fun Fact Sheet: Globefish

I am a globefish. My name reflects my appearance, having a body that I can inflate.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 20.08.2019

Fun Fact Sheet: Giant Trevally

Out of the large trevally family, the most well-known is the Giant Trevally.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 20.08.2019

Fun Fact Sheet: Mullet

Two species of mullet are found in the lagoon at Cocos (Keeling) Islands; diamond scale mullet and sea mullet.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 20.08.2019

Fun Fact Sheet: Mulloway

Mulloway is an aboriginal name meaning 'the greatest one' and growing to an impressive 30 kilograms, it's easy to see how they get their name.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 20.08.2019

Fun Fact Sheet: Flying Fish

Flying fish are found in all of the oceans particularly in tropical and sub-tropical waters.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 20.08.2019

Fun Fact Sheet: Flounder

Typically found in estuaries and coastal waters off Western Australia, flounder have an interesting life history.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 20.08.2019

Fun Fact Sheet: Estuarine Cobbler

I am a type of catfish called an estuarine cobbler.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 20.08.2019

Fun Fact Sheet: Eels

Although snake-like in appearance, eels are not actually related to snakes or the reptile family at all.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 20.08.2019

Fun Fact Sheet: Dolphin

Bottlenose dolphins have prominent dorsal fins, which can often be seen slicing through the water. The fin is slightly hooked in shape and set midway along the body.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 20.08.2019

Fun Fact Sheet: Dogtooth Tuna

Dogtooth tuna are not like other tunas; they are slow-moving demersal fish (bottom dwelling) and tend to stay in one area.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 20.08.2019

Fun Fact Sheet: Dhufish

Dhufish are endemic to Western Australia, meaning they are found no where else in the world.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 20.08.2019

Fun Fact Sheet: Coral Trout

I am a predator species that lives on coral reefs.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 20.08.2019

Lesson: Gyotaku

Students will create a fish print using a species of bony fish.

Resource type: LessonLast updated: 15.08.2019

Fact Sheet: Commercial Fishing

Where do you get your seafood?
Do you catch it, or is it handed over the fence by your fishing obsessed neighbour or do you buy it from your local fishmonger or supermarket?

Resource type: Fact SheetLast updated: 18.06.2019

Fact Sheet: Eighty Mile Beach

Imagine an isolated beach of endless white sand, seashells and turquoise waters, stretching so far it would take more than a week to walk its length. Aptly named, Eighty Mile Beach is indeed long, stretching 220 kilometres and renowned as Australia's longest uninterrupted beach.

Resource type: Fact SheetLast updated: 18.06.2019

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