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Fishy Fun Sheet: Clownfish – Dot-to-Dot

Dot-to-dot. This fish has a special relationship with a sea anemone.

Resource type: Fishy Fun SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fishy Fun Sheet: Mola Sunfish – Dot-to-Dot

Dot-to-dot. I am one of the heaviest fish in the world. Can you guess what species I am?

Resource type: Fishy Fun SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fishy Fun Sheet: Seahorse – Dot-to-Dot

Dot-to-dot. Discover the creature hidden amongst the seagrass.

Resource type: Fishy Fun SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fishy Fun Sheet: Fish out of Water – Maze

Can you help the flying fish fly through the maze and avoid predators?

Resource type: Fishy Fun SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fishy Fun Sheet: Pearl Oyster – Maze

The WA pearl oyster fishery is the only remaining significant wild-stock fishery for pearl oysters in the world. Can you help the diver find the pearl oyster beds?

Resource type: Fishy Fun SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fun Fact Sheet: Eels

Although snake-like in appearance, eels are not actually related to snakes or the reptile family at all.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fun Fact Sheet: Loggerhead Turtle

The loggerhead turtle is one of six marine turtles found in Australia, including the green, leatherback, olive ridley, hawksbill and flatback turtles.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fishy Fun Sheet: Mola Mola – Colour In

Colour me in. The ocean sunfish or common mola (Mola mola) is the heaviest known bony fish in the world. Adults typically weigh between 247 and 1,000kg.

Resource type: Fishy Fun SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fishy Fun Sheet: Seahorse – Colour by Numbers

Colour by numbers. Colour in the image by matching the number with the colour code. What is hiding in the sea?

Resource type: Fishy Fun SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fishy Fun Sheet: Seahorse Pair – Colour In

Colour me in. The two eyes of a seahorse are able to move independently of each other.

Resource type: Fishy Fun SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fishy Fun Sheet: Dot-to-Dot: Blue Tang

Who is swimming around the coral?

Resource type: Fishy Fun SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fishy Fun Sheet: Coral Fish – Dot-to-Dot

Dot-to-dot. What is swimming in the sea?

Resource type: Fishy Fun SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fun Fact Sheet: Chiton

There are around 1,000 different species of chitons worldwide. In Australia, South Australia has the greatest concentration of species.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fun Fact Sheet: Barnacles

There are 1,200 species of barnacles around the world that come in a variety of shapes and sizes.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fun Fact Sheet: Lionfish

I am brightly coloured and have a pattern of zebra-like stripes over my body. These stripes are usually white and either red, maroon or brown.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fun Fact Sheet: West Australian Seahorse

Swaying in the current, anchored by their grasping tails, seahorses are actually a type of small fish - with bony plates protecting their bodies instead of scales.

Resource type: Fun Fact SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fishy Fun Sheet: Whale Shark – Colour In

Did you know that whale sharks (despite their name) aren't marine mammals like whales? They are in fact sharks, being in the same class as fish and their massive size makes them the largest fish in the world!

Resource type: Fishy Fun SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fishy Fun Sheet: Sandbar Shark – Colour In

WA's shark fisheries are strictly managed and are mainly fished for their meat for sale in fish and chip shops.

Resource type: Fishy Fun SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fishy Fun Sheet: Dot-to-Dot: Whaleshark

I am the world's largest fish and can grow to around 18 metres, what am I?

Resource type: Fishy Fun SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

Fact Sheet: Brown Mud Crab

Thought to be the green mud crab for many years; it wasn't until 1998, that the brown mud crab was recognised as a distinct species.

Resource type: Fact SheetLast updated: 09.06.2022

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