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Fact Sheet: North Coast

Western Australia’s North Coast bioregion is one of the world’s last great wilderness areas with waters inhabited by rich biodiversity.

Resource type: Fact SheetLast updated: 08.06.2020

Fact Sheet: Mangroves

Mangrove forests are one of Australia's most geographically widespread ecosystems. They provide a crucial role in the protection of Australia's coastline as well as being vital for the biological health and productivity of Australia's coastal waters.

Resource type: Fact SheetLast updated: 26.05.2020

Fact Sheet: Intertidal rocky shores

Reefs provide a foundation for many plants and animals, supporting a great diversity of marine organisms that rely on the reef for food, protection, shelter and somewhere to reproduce. Reefs create a natural buffer to strong winds and waves that would otherwise erode the coastline.

Resource type: Fact SheetLast updated: 26.05.2020

Fact Sheet: Roebuck Bay

With an exceptionally large tidal range, Roebuck Bay is one moment a sublime seascape, and the next, an incredibly vast mudflat that shimmers with heat mirages under the tropical sun.

Resource type: Fact SheetLast updated: 12.05.2020

Fact Sheet: Montgomery Reef

Montgomery Reef is like no other reef system on earth. Formed some 1.8 billion years ago, this ancient reef is recognised today as one of the most significant geological marine environments in the Kimberley.

Resource type: Fact SheetLast updated: 12.05.2020

Fact Sheet: Prince Frederick Harbour

Cruising along the coast, it can be difficult to fathom the true scale of the Kimberley, with thousands of islands, inlets, bays, rivers and creeks. It is not until you enter the huge bay of Prince Frederick Harbour that you are given a real appreciation for the dimensions of the Kimberley coast.

Resource type: Fact SheetLast updated: 12.05.2020

Fact Sheet: Eighty Mile Beach

Imagine an isolated beach of endless white sand, seashells and turquoise waters, stretching so far it would take more than a week to walk its length. Aptly named, Eighty Mile Beach is indeed long, stretching 220 kilometres and renowned as Australia's longest uninterrupted beach.

Resource type: Fact SheetLast updated: 08.05.2020

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