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Fishy Features

Posted on: May 6, 2014

Group of tropical fishIt’s Term 2 already and we’re ready to deliver our next Professional Learning session! 

This terms session is showcasing the Department of Fisheries activity ‘Fishy Features’. Aimed at Year 5 – 12 teachers (and pre-service teachers), this session focuses on adaptations of fish. Come and learn about the functional, behavioural and structural adaptations that organisms in the marine environment exhibit to survive. We’ll be getting up close and personal with a variety of species of fish to study the differences in their structural adaptations. 

We’ll also talk about how you could use this activity at school and look at some pre- and post- excursion resources. This session includes a range of hands-on and fun learning activities, take-away hard copy resources and a certificate of attendance.

Where: Western Australian Fisheries and Marine Research Laboratories
39 Northside Drive, Hillarys WA 6025

Date:   Thursday 15 May, 2014 (Week 3 Term 2)

Time:   4.00 pm – 5.30 pm
Registration from 3.45 pm

Registrations are essential. To book your place at this PL, please click here.

To find out more about our upcoming Professional Learning sessions, click here.

Australian Curriculum Outcomes: ACSSU043, ACSSU094, ACSSU111, ACSSU150, ACSSU175
 

Professional Learning in 2014

Posted on: January 3, 2014

Scientific-sandcastlesHappy New Year!  We hope you’re having a good break and are starting to think about new and exciting learning experiences for your class.

We know that many primary school teachers choose themes each term and a popular term 1 theme is the sea. With this in mind, our first Professional Learning session for 2014 is aimed at Kindergarten to Year 6 teachers and to get you inspired, we will be visiting the beach (hats and appropriate footwear are recommended!) 

In this session, we will discuss the Department of Fisheries activity Scientific Sandcastles – the logistics of how we get your class to the beach and what actually takes place in the activity. We’ll also talk about how you could use this activity at school, in the sandpit and look at some pre- and post- excursion resources also.

This session will take place on Thursday 20th February 2014 from 4.00pm – 5.30pm at the Naturaliste Marine Discovery Centre – 39 Northside Drive, Hillarys. To book your place at this PL, click here.   

Something else also to keep in mind in term 1 is Seaweek, which runs from 1st – 9th March 2014. Seaweek is the Marine Education Society of Australasia’s major national public awareness campaign. To get you all ready to teach marine education in your classroom, we’re offering to come to your school during February and conduct a free professional learning session with your staff!

(The fine print – A minimum number of 10 participants is required for the Department of Fisheries to come to your school to run a free professional learning session. This offer is currently only open to Perth, WA, metropolitan schools. Session duration is 60 minutes and can be run after school hours. Places are limited and will be offered on a first come, first served basis.)

To express your interest in having a Department of Fisheries Community and Education team member come to your school to run a professional learning session, click here.

Spot the Sea Monkey!

Posted on: December 10, 2012

Artemia

It’s that time of the year where you’re either planning for next year, thinking about planning for next year, and/or looking for new and exciting resources to use in your teaching and learning programme. As a result, we’re still releasing new lesson plans to help inspire you!

Our latest lesson plan release is Amazing Artemia. You can use the information provided in the Teacher Background Information to teach your students about Artemia and Appendix 1 to set up your own Artemia hatcheries in your own classroom.

In Activity 3: Speedy Shrimps, students will attempt to race their Artemia to determine if one sex is faster than the other.  You could also try changing variables to see if they affect the speed of the Artemia – e.g. using cold water or putting a light at one end of the test tube. Conduct a discussion with your students to brainstorm other variables.

Australian Curriculum outcomes: ACELA1430, ACELA1453, ACELA1470, ACELA1484,  ACELA1498, ACELA1512, ACELA1786, ACELY1648, ACELY1658, ACELY1668, ACELY1688, ACELY1784, ACELY1788, ACELY1789, ACELY1792, ACELY1796, ACSIS053, ACSIS064, ACSIS124, ACSIS215, ACSIS216, ACSIS218, ACSIS221, ACSIS231, ACSIS232, ACSSU017, ACSSU030, ACSSU043, ACSSU072

The nuisance of the ocean

Posted on: November 27, 2012

Common blowfish

The common blowfish is often regarded as a nuisance to fishers, gobbling bait before any other species can get near it.  However, these fish are native to Western Australia (and therefore are not pests) and play an important role in keeping our marine ecosystems clean by eating waste bait and berley.

Common blowfish are found along the lower west coast of WA but also have a northern relative.  The northwest blowfish inhabits northern Australian waters but is also occasionally seen off the lower west coast as far south as Cape Naturaliste. Northwest blowfish are significantly larger than the common blowfish, reaching a maximum of 88 cm in length, compared to the common blowfish at 22 cm.

Both species of blowfish contain a highly lethal toxin so they are not generally targeted by fishers– however they still have a bag limit. Visit the Department of Fisheries website to find out more about bag and size limits in your area. To learn more about other ways we manage recreational fisheries in Western Australia, see the Marine WATERs lesson plan: Fishing for the Future.  

Fishers are reminded not to leave blowfish to die on beaches and jetties as pets have died from eating them.

Want to know more about this species or of the many other species found in Western Australia? See our extensive range of fact sheets.

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